February 19, 2012 archive

Feb 19

Today on The Stars Hollow Gazette

Our regular featured content-

These featured articles-

our weekly features-

Feb 19

Cartnoon

Win, Lose, or Duck, Duck Dodgers Episode 5, Season 3.

Feb 19

Health and Fitness News

Welcome to the Health and Fitness weekly diary which is cross-posted from The Stars Hollow Gazette. It is open for discussion about health related issues including diet, exercise, health and health care issues, as well as, tips on what you can do when there is a medical emergency. Also an opportunity to share and exchange your favorite healthy recipes.

Questions are encouraged and I will answer to the best of my ability. If I can’t, I will try to steer you in the right direction. Naturally, I cannot give individual medical advice for personal health issues. I can give you information about medical conditions and the current treatments available.

You can now find past Health and Fitness News diaries here and on the right hand side of the Front Page.

Chicken Stews, to Savor or Store Away

Chicken Cacciatore

I wanted each of these stews to feature a nutritious vegetable along with the chicken and aromatics. In this way they are truly one-dish, nutrient-dense meals. Though I suggest serving them with rice, other grains or pasta, if carbs are an issue, know that these stews are very satisfying on their own.

Martha Rose Shulman

Chicken Cacciatore With Mushrooms, Tomatoes and Wine

This version of the classic Italian dish includes lots of mushrooms, both dried and fresh; you can add kale if you want to work in some leafy greens.

Greek Chicken Stew With Cauliflower and Olives

Cinnamon adds a subtle sweetness to this stew. If salt is an issue, omit the olives; the stew will still be delicious.

Chicken Stew With Sweet Potatoes, Almonds and Apricots

Loosely based on an Algerian recipe from “Real Stew” by Clifford A. Wright, this sweetly spiced dish, with beta-carotene-rich apricots and sweet potatoes, is also evocative of recipes from the Middle East and Iran.

Chicken and Pepper Stew

This is an adaptation of a classic French bistro dish, poulet Basquaise.

Veracruzana Chicken Stew With Winter Squash

This dish is loosely based on a chicken stew from the Mexican state of Veracruz, where Spanish influences still remain strong.

Feb 19

Ladies and Gentlemen- Victoria Jackson

A True Conservative Has to Be Christian

Voted on Slavery

Is Drinking Alcohol a Sin?

PolitiChicks (& Dudes) Drop in on “Occupy CPAC” Protest

Lesbian!

Are Liberals Anti-Christian and Pro-Muslim? With Morgan Brittany (Ep 21)

Victoria Jackson Is Really This Dumb

Feb 19

On This Day In History February 19

Cross posted from The Stars Hollow Gazette

This is your morning Open Thread. Pour your favorite beverage and review the past and comment on the future.

Find the past “On This Day in History” here.

February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 315 days remaining until the end of the year (316 in leap years).

On this day in 1942, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, authorizing the removal of any or all people from military areas “as deemed necessary or desirable.” The military in turn defined the entire West Coast, home to the majority of Americans of Japanese ancestry or citizenship, as a military area. By June, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were relocated to remote internment camps built by the U.S. military in scattered locations around the country. For the next two and a half years, many of these Japanese Americans endured extremely difficult living conditions and poor treatment by their military guards.

The Order

The order authorized the Secretary of War and U.S. armed forces commanders to declare areas of the United States as military areas “from which any or all persons may be excluded,” although it did not name any nationality or ethnic group. It was eventually applied to one-third of the land area of the U.S. (mostly in the West) and was used against those with “Foreign Enemy Ancestry” – Japanese.

The order led to the internment of Japanese Americans or AJAs (Americans of Japanese Ancestry); some 120,000 ethnic Japanese people were held in internment camps for the duration of the war. Of the Japanese interned, 62% were Nisei (American-born, second-generation Japanese American and therefore American citizens) or Sansei (third-generation Japanese American, also American citizens) and the rest were Issei (Japanese immigrants and resident aliens, first-generation Japanese American).

Japanese Americans were by far the most widely affected group, as all persons with Japanese ancestry were removed from the West Coast and southern Arizona. As then California Attorney General Earl Warren put it, “When we are dealing with the Caucasian race we have methods that will test the loyalty of them. But when we deal with the Japanese, we are on an entirely different field.” In Hawaii, where there were 140,000 Americans of Japanese Ancestry (constituting 37% of the population), only selected individuals of heightened perceived risk were interned.

Americans of Italian and German ancestry were also targeted by these restrictions, including internment. 11,000 people of German ancestry were interned, as were 3,000 people of Italian ancestry, along with some Jewish refugees. The Jewish refugees who were interned came from Germany, and the U.S. government didn’t differentiate between ethnic Jews and ethnic Germans (jewish was defined as religious practice). Some of the internees of European descent were interned only briefly, and others were held for several years beyond the end of the war. Like the Japanese internees, these smaller groups had American-born citizens in their numbers, especially among the children. A few members of ethnicities of other Axis countries were interned, but exact numbers are unknown.

Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson was responsible for assisting relocated people with transport, food, shelter, and other accommodations.

Opposition

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover opposed the internment, not on constitutional grounds, but because he believed that the most likely spies had already been arrested by the FBI shortly after the Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. First lady Eleanor Roosevelt was also opposed to Executive Order 9066. She spoke privately many times with her husband, but was unsuccessful in convincing him not to sign it

Post World War II

Executive Order 9066 was rescinded by Gerald Ford on February 19, 1976. In 1980, Jimmy Carter signed legislation to create the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). The CWRIC was appointed to conduct an official governmental study of Executive Order 9066, related wartime orders, and their impact on Japanese Americans in the West and Alaska Natives in the Pribilof Islands.

In December 1982, the CWRIC issued its findings in Personal Justice Denied, concluding that the incarceration of Japanese Americans had not been justified by military necessity. The report determined that the decision to incarcerate was based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.” The Commission recommended legislative remedies consisting of an official Government apology and redress payments of $20,000 to each of the survivors; a public education fund was set up to help ensure that this would not happen again (Public Law 100-383).

On August 10, 1988, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, based on the CWRIC recommendations, was signed into law by Ronald Reagan. On November 21, 1989, George H.W. Bush signed an appropriation bill authorizing payments to be paid out between 1990 and 1998. In 1990, surviving internees began to receive individual redress payments and a letter of apology.

Feb 19

Six In The Morning

On Sunday

 Palestinian’s Trial Shines Light on Military Justice

 

    By ISABEL KERSHNER

NABI SALEH, West Bank – A year ago, Islam Dar Ayyoub was a sociable ninth grader and a good student, according to his father, Saleh, a Palestinian laborer in this small village near Ramallah.

Then, one night in January 2011, about 20 Israeli soldiers surrounded the dilapidated Dar Ayyoub home and pounded vigorously on the door. Islam, who was 14 at the time, said he thought they had come for his older brother. Instead, they had come for him. He was blindfolded, handcuffed and whisked away in a jeep.




Sunday’s Headlines:

As Libya celebrates a year of freedom, evidence grows of its disintegration

Inside the torture chamber of Assad’s inquisition squads

Knives out over bid to bar Mugabe

Nuke crisis caused by Japan, not quake: Kan

Mexico female presidential candidate Mota Vazquez embraces role

Feb 19

Arthur Silber takes Taibbi to the woodshed on Iran

Photobucket

Holy Piccolo Pete and my blood-curdly-caked external meatus in the ululating shrillness of the dark wilderness where the straight way was lost!  Sending Arthur money was the best hundred bucks I ever spent!   I’m actually considering getting some sort of job to proceed with regular tithing to his cathedral of tears.

Obviously, we all owe Matt Taibbi an eternal debt of gratitude for his ongoing savage humiliation of the Nancy capitalists who continue destroying our lives.  It’s fair to say he got under the flinty thin skin of these epicurean dealmakers.  I bow deeply in Taibbi’s direction for his regular savagery against their felonious assaults upon democracy, and for writing one of the best extended phrases ever written in the Mother Tongue.

However, Arthur Silber rightly castigates Taibbi for parroting the official US/Israeli government lines that “Ahmadinejad is nuts.”  “He can’t be allowed to have nukes!”  “Something must be done!”  If you ever actually listen to, say, an interview of Ahmadinejad by Charlie Rose, you would rightly conclude that “Charlie Rose is nuts.”  

Also, if you pay any attention to such news, you would also rightly conclude that “Uncle Sam is nuts,” “The New York Times is nuts,”  “Diane Sawyer and Brian Ross are nuts,”, “Erin Burnett is nuts,” and so on.  Any casual brush with history would inform you of these elementary facts.

I urge you to read Arthur’s spat-out of Taibbi’s harmful Pavlovian regurgitation of neoconservative crop milk.