March 19, 2012 archive

Mar 19

Today on The Stars Hollow Gazette

Our regular featured content-

And these featured articles-

This is an Open Thread

The Stars Hollow Gazette

Mar 19

Monday Meta Phors

Goldman Sachs

A Muppet

:

An iframe

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An embed

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Mar 19

Monday Meta Phores

Goldman Sachs

A Muppet

:

An iframe

<iframe src=”http://media.mtvnservices.com/embed/mgid:cms:video:colbertnation.com:410650″ width=”480″ height=”270″ frameborder=”0″></iframe>

An embed

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790 on the ‘English’ section.

Mar 19

On This Day In History March 19

Cross posted from The Stars Hollow Gazette

This is your morning Open Thread. Pour your favorite beverage and review the past and comment on the future.

Find the past “On This Day in History” here.

March 19 is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 287 days remaining until the end of the year.

On this day in 1941, the 99th Pursuit Squadron also known as the Tuskegee Airmen, the first all-black unit of the Army Air Corp, is activated.

The Tuskegee Airmen is the popular name of a group of African American pilots who fought in World War II. Formally, they were the 332nd Fighter Group and the 477th Bombardment Group of the U.S. Army Air Corps.

The Tuskegee Airmen were the first African American military aviators in the United States armed forces. During World War II, African Americans in many U.S. states still were subject to racist Jim Crow laws. The American military was racially segregated, as was much of the federal government. The Tuskegee Airmen were subject to racial discrimination, both within and outside the army. Despite these adversities, they trained and flew with distinction. Although the 477th Bombardment Group “worked up” on North American B-25 Mitchell bombers, they never served in combat; the Tuskegee 332nd Fighter Group was the only operational unit, first sent overseas as part of Operation Torch, then in action in Sicily and Italy, before being deployed as bomber escorts in Europe where they were particularly successful in their missions.

The Tuskegee Airmen initially were equipped with Curtiss P-40 Warhawks fighter-bomber aircraft, briefly with Bell P-39 Airacobras (March 1944), later with Republic P-47 Thunderbolts (June-July 1944), and finally the fighter group acquired the aircraft with which they became most commonly associated, the North American P-51 Mustang (July 1944). When the pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group painted the tails of their P-47’s red, the nickname “Red Tails” was coined. Bomber crews applied a more effusive “Red-Tail Angels” sobriquet.

Background

Before the Tuskegee Airmen, no African American had become a U.S. military pilot. In 1917, African-American men had tried to become aerial observers, but were rejected, however, African American Eugene Bullard served as one of the members of the Franco-American Lafayette Escadrille. Nonetheless, he was denied the opportunity to transfer to American military units as a pilot when the other American pilots in the unit were offered the chance. Instead, Bullard returned to infantry duty with the French.

The racially motivated rejections of World War I African-American recruits sparked over two decades of advocacy by African-Americans who wished to enlist and train as military aviators. The effort was led by such prominent civil rights leaders as Walter White of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, labor union leader A. Philip Randolph, and Judge William H. Hastie. Finally, on 3 April 1939, Appropriations Bill Public Law 18 was passed by Congress containing an amendment designating funds for training African-American pilots. The War Department managed to deflect the monies into funding civilian flight schools willing to train black Americans.

War Department tradition and policy mandated the segregation of African-Americans into separate military units staffed by white officers, as had been done previously with the 9th Cavalry, 10th Cavalry, 24th Infantry Regiment and 25th Infantry Regiment. When the appropriation of funds for aviation training created opportunities for pilot cadets, their numbers diminished the rosters of these older units. A further series of legislative moves by the United States Congress in 1941 forced the Army Air Corps to form an all-black combat unit, despite the War Department’s reluctance.

Due to the restrictive nature of selection policies, the situation did not seem promising for African-Americans since, in 1940, the U.S. Census Bureau reported only 124 African-American pilots in the nation. The exclusionary policies failed dramatically when the Air Corps received an abundance of applications from men who qualified, even under the restrictive requirements. Many of the applicants already had participated in the Civilian Pilot Training Program, in which the historically black Tuskegee Institute had participated since 1939.

Mar 19

Cartnoon

Crusader vs. the Pirates

Crusader Rabbit Crusade 2 Episode 12

Open Thread

Mar 19

Muse in the Morning

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Muse in the Morning


Blue Skies

Mar 19

Late Night Karaoke

Mar 19

Flop Gun

The USS Enterprise is steaming for Iran on it’s last voyage.  Sacrifical lamb in another 911 false flag event?  The alt news is all abuzz about it.  I know we made it past the earlier prophecized dates but that does not stop “them”.  What has been in “the news” of late.  The Titanic.  No mention however about destroying the first amenedment with HR 347.  More on dysfunctional cultures in the flip side.

Mar 19

Pique the Geek 20120318: Ovarian Cysts

Ovarian cysts are an extremely common condition in women of childbearing age, and not uncommon in women past menopause.  In fact, most women of childbearing age have ovarian cysts that produce no symptoms.  However, when the cysts become large or inflamed pain is often experienced.

There are several types of ovarian cysts, and they can cause different symptoms.  Diagnosis is made by ultrasonic, MRI, or CT methods.  Often a combination of techniques is used to obtain a more definitive diagnosis, and rarely laproscopic procedures are used.  Ovarian cysts are divided into two broad categories:  functional cysts and nonfunctional cysts.  Functional cysts are those that are not associated with any disease process, whilst nonfunctional cysts are definitely associated with a disease process.