The Coming View of History.

( – promoted by buhdydharma )

Let us, with prescience, practice the patter of those denizens of the AM dial:

The Obama deficit.

The Obama recession.

Can I Get Me An Obama depression?

Obama deflation and stagflation and free-market implosion.

Obama poverty and unemployment and deflation and stock market crash and housing crisis.

The Barack Obama bank failures™. The Barack Obama layoffs©. The Barack Obama bankruptcies®.

Judasbama, The Black Plaguebama, The Dark Ageobamas, The Spanish Inquisibama, The Civil Bama, The Bolshevik Revobama, The Salem Whichobama, World War Onebama, World War Twobama, The Korean Obama, The Invasion of Gernadaobama, Totalitariobama, Commubisobama, Facisobama, Socialobama, Benito Moussebama, John Wilkes Boothobama, Sirhan Sirbama, Lee Harvey Osbama, Pol Potobama, Richard Nixobama, Acnebama, Menobama, The Premature Ejecubama, The Four-Hour, Consult Your Doctor, Barack Orection… and of course Adolph fucking Barack Goddman Godwin Huessein Hitbama.

Ain’t it convenient, for those who’ve been in power, that the Barack Obama administration coincided…

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    • RUKind on November 22, 2008 at 10:41 am

    The last eight years were just an illusion. Foolish me, I thought the nightmare was real. Everything has been so much better since those two guys in black suits and shades showed up at my door. The posse comitatus took away the habeas corpses and disappeared in the mist. Will they ever return?

    Stay tuned in. And turned on. Drop back into reality. It can’t be any worse than what just went down.

  1. crashed when I tried to comment here before, so I will do this in pieces, and apologies in advance for breaking this into small pieces when it should just be one long comment.

    From Chuck Schumer in 1987:

    Citing the pressures of rigorous worldwide competition in financial services, large American banks are pleading for the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act, a law that keeps banks out of the more volatile and risky world of securities transactions. Their entreaties should be resisted. The reasons the act was passed are still valid, and it has not interfered with our ability to compete internationally.

    The Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 evolved from the bitter experience of the Depression, when American banking was in shambles. Left free to speculate in the 1920’s, banks naturally looked where profits seemed highest, and were inevitably drawn into risky propositions. When a few banks failed, depositors nationwide panicked. Runs on banks pushed this country over the brink of financial disaster.

    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/f

  2. A dozen framed magazine covers, their colors as vivid as an Andy Warhol painting, are the most arresting. Each heralds Mr. Weill’s genius in assembling Citigroup into the most powerful financial institution since the House of Morgan a century ago.[snip]

    These days, Mr. Weill and many of the nation’s very wealthy chief executives, entrepreneurs and financiers echo an earlier era – the Gilded Age before World War I – when powerful enterprises, dominated by men who grew immensely rich, ushered in the industrialization of the United States.[snip]

    Those earlier barons disappeared by the 1920s and, constrained by the Depression and by the greater government oversight and high income tax rates that followed, no one really took their place. Then, starting in the late 1970s, as the constraints receded, new tycoons gradually emerged, and now their concentrated wealth has made the early years of the 21st century truly another Gilded Age.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07

    So how’s THAT workin’ out for ya, Mr. Citibank?

  3. showing the difference between economic growth under Democrats as opposed to elephants:

    http://www.nytimes.com/interac

    and

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.c

  4. Benito Moussebama

    That would be “Alaskobama” if it were spelled “Moosobama”, or maybe, “Rogainobama,” but not “Fascisobama,” which would probably be spelled “Mussobama.”  I’m afraid to ask, but what were you thinking?  

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