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Fake News!

feline lasix benefits and side effects Although it might be better described as ‘Government Produced Propoganda’.

http://buy-generic-clomid.com The story is that in the wee hours of January 21, 2017 the White House, after viewing official National Park Service photography of Trump’s Inaguration, was dissatisfied with the disturbing lack of Trumpista bigots, misogynists, racists, Nazis, hypocritical God fearing so-called ‘Christians’, and ignorant, red-neck, gun-totin’ products of generations of incest in them.

http://acrossaday.com/?search=discount-warehouse-rogaine-propecia-cheap In short the crowd was too small.

So the National Park Service was sent back to produce Photoshopped images that were a little more flattering, like airbrushing a cover shot or in this case creepy pictures from unncanny valley that look nothing at all like zombie Peter Cushing.

Now this is significant for at least a couple of reasons. First it shows that the pettiness and vanity of this Administration is boundless.

Second, this happened the night http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=find-cialis-no-prescription-required prezzo levitra generico 20 mg before the 2.5 Million member cheap warehouse rogaine generic propecia Women’s March on Washington though all the early indicators showed (as turned out to be the case) that it would be the largest event in D.C. since the first Inauguration of Barack Obama.

http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=prezzo-vardenafil-in-farmacia-pagamento-online Trump inauguration crowd photos were edited after he intervened
by Jon Swaine, The Guardian
Thu 6 Sep 2018

A government photographer edited official pictures of Donald Trump’s inauguration to make the crowd appear bigger following a personal intervention from the president, according to newly released documents.

The photographer cropped out empty space “where the crowd ended” for a new set of pictures requested by Trump on the first morning of his presidency, after he was angered by images showing his audience was smaller than Barack Obama’s in 2009.

The records detail a scramble within the National Park Service (NPS) on 21 January 2017 after an early-morning phone call between Trump and the acting NPS director, Michael Reynolds. They also state that Sean Spicer, then White House press secretary, called NPS officials repeatedly that day in pursuit of the more flattering photographs.

It was not clear from the records which photographs were edited and whether they were released publicly.

The newly disclosed details were not included in the inspector general’s office’s final report on its inquiry into the saga, which was http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=read-and-buy-cialis-from-online-drugstore-no-prescription published in June last year and gave a different account of the NPS photographer’s actions.

By the time Trump spoke on the telephone with Reynolds on the morning after the inauguration, then-and-now pictures of the national mall were circulating online showing that Trump’s crowd fell short of Obama’s. A reporter’s tweet containing one such pair of images was enter retweeted by the official NPS Twitter account.

An NPS communications official, whose name was redacted in the released files, told investigators that Reynolds called her after speaking with the president and said Trump wanted pictures from the inauguration. She said “she got the impression that President Trump wanted to see pictures that appeared to depict more spectators in the crowd”, and that the images released so far showed “a lot of empty areas”.

The communications official said she “assumed” the photographs Trump was requesting “needed to be cropped”, but that Reynolds did not ask for this specifically. She then contacted the NPS photographer who had covered the event the day before.

A second official, from the NPS public affairs department, told investigators that Spicer called her office on the morning of 21 January and asked for pictures that “accurately represented the inauguration crowd size”.

In this official’s view, Spicer’s request amounted to “a request for NPS to provide photographs in which it appeared the inauguration crowd filled the majority of the space in the photograph”. She told investigators that she, too, contacted the NPS photographer to ask for additional shots.

The NPS photographer, whose name was also redacted, told investigators he was contacted by an unidentified official who asked for “any photographs that showed the inauguration crowd sizes”. Having filed 25 photographs on inauguration day, he was asked to go back to his office and “edit a few more” for a second submission.

“He said he edited the inauguration photographs to make them look more symmetrical by cropping out the sky and cropping out the bottom where the crowd ended,” the investigators reported, adding: “He said he did so to show that there had been more of a crowd.”

A summary in the inspector general’s final report said the photographer told investigators “he selected a number of photos, based on his professional judgment, that concentrated on the area of the national mall where most of the crowd was standing”.

Asked to account for the discrepancy, Nancy DiPaolo, a spokeswoman for the inspector general, said the cropping was not mentioned in the final report because the photographer told investigators this was his “standard artistic practice”. But investigators did not note this in the write-up of their interview.

The newly released files said Spicer was closely involved in the effort to obtain more favourable photographs. He called Reynolds immediately after the acting director spoke with Trump and then again at 3pm shortly before the new set of photographs was sent to the White House, investigators heard. Another official reported being called by Spicer.