The Breafast Club (Rage)

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We’re a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we’re not too hungover we’ve been bailed out we’re not too exhausted from last night’s (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:00am (ET) (or whenever we get around to it) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late, it’s PhilJD’s fault.

This Day in History

Chinese troops crush a pro-democracy movement in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square; World War II’s Battle of Midway begins; Henry Ford tests his quadricycle; Bruce Springsteen releases ‘Born in the U.S.A.’

Breakfast Tunes

Something to Think about over Coffee Prozac

To be a Negro in this country and to be relatively conscious is to be in a rage almost all the time.

James Baldwin

Continue reading

All Four

Attorney General Keith Ellison to elevate charges against officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck; also charging other 3 involved

By Stephen Montemayor and Chao Xiong Star Tribune

Attorney General Keith Ellison plans to elevate charges against the former Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck while adding charges of aiding and abetting murder against the other three officers at the scene, according to multiple law enforcement sources familiar with the case.

Ellison is expected to provide an update this afternoon on the state’s investigation into Floyd’s death. According to sources, former officer Derek Chauvin, recorded on video kneeling on Floyd’s neck as he begged for air on May 25, will now be charged with second-degree murder.

The other three officers at the scene — Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane — will also be charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder, according to the sources, who spoke on conditions of anonymity. Chauvin was arrested last Friday and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Thao was recorded watching as Chauvin continued to press on Floyd’s neck with his knee. Kueng was one of the first officers on the scene and helped pin Floyd down. Lane was detailed in earlier charges as pointing a gun at Floyd before handcuffing, and later asked whether officers should roll Floyd on his side as he was restrained.

The charges come just days after Gov. Tim Walz asked Ellison to take over the prosecution, which until Sunday had been led by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office.

Up Date: At his press conference, Minnesota AG Ellison announced that officers Thao, Keung and Lane are being charged with aiding and abetting second degree murder in the death of George Floyd.

Apparently Sean Hannity Has Been Divorced For Years

Ok, it was this or more Neo Liberal Failure and Modern Monetary Theory.

Consider yourself spared.

For now.

Sean Hannity and wife divorce after more than 20 years of marriage
By Emily Smith, Page Six, New York Post
June 3, 2020

Fox News host Sean Hannity and his wife, Jill Rhodes, have divorced after more than 20 years of marriage, Page Six has exclusively confirmed.

Hannity, 58, and former journalist Rhodes, 57, were married in 1993 and have two children, a son, Patrick, and a daughter, Merri Kelly.

Friends of the former couple say they have been legally divorced for more than a year and separated many years prior to that, but kept it under wraps.

However, rumors of a split were floating around prior to the COVID-19 pandemic as Rhodes was not seen at various Fox News events alongside Hannity.

When asked for comment, Hannity and Rhodes issued a joint statement to Page Six, which reads, “Sean and Jill are committed to working together for the best interests of their children. Amicable agreements were entered into over four years ago between Sean and Jill.

“They maintain a close relationship as parents to their children. Neither will have any further comments and ask for the sake of their children that their privacy be respected.”

One friend of the former couple, who lived together on Long Island, said their split “is very amicable. Sean and Jill remain on very good terms and still have family dinners, and attend tennis tournaments for their children. Sean is still close with members of Jill’s family.”

The friend said neither Hannity — the host of “Hannity” on Fox News and of the nationally syndicated talk radio show “The Sean Hannity Show” — nor Rhodes were involved with other people and that “Sean is basically a workaholic.”

Hannity once said Rhodes was the brains behind his success as a talk show host and the author of three best-selling books. He dedicated his first book, “Let Freedom Ring: Winning the War of Liberty Over Liberalism,” to her in 2002.

What’s that word? Oh yeah, schadenfreude.

Pondering the Pundits

Pondering the Pundits” is an Open Thread. It is a selection of editorials and opinions from around the news media and the internet blogs. The intent is to provide a forum for your reactions and opinions, not just to the opinions presented, but to what ever you find important.

Thanks to ek hornbeck, click on the link and you can access all the past “Pondering the Pundits”.

Follow us on Twitter @StarsHollowGzt

Salman Rushdie: I’ve seen dictators rise and fall. Beware, America.

In my life, I have seen several dictators rise and fall. Today, I’m remembering those earlier incarnations of this unlovely breed. [..]

Extreme narcissism, detachment from reality, a fondness for sycophants and a distrust of truth-tellers, an obsession with how one is publicly portrayed, a hatred of journalists and the temperament of an out-of-control bulldozer: These are some of the characteristics.

President Trump is, temperamentally, a tinpot despot of this type. But he finds himself in charge of a country that has historically thought of itself — by no means always correctly — as being on the side of liberty. So far, with the collusion of the Republican Party, he has ruled more or less unchecked. Now an election looms, and he is unpopular, and flails about looking for a winning strategy. And if that means trampling over American freedoms, then so be it. [..]

If he is allowed to use the actions of a tiny minority of criminals and white extremist infiltrators to invalidate the honorable protest of the vast majority against the murder of Floyd, the violence of the police toward the black community and the entrenched power of American racism, he will be on his way to despotism. He has threatened to use the Army against American citizens, a threat one might have expected from a leader of the former Soviet Union, but not of the United States.

In my most recent novel, “Quichotte,” I characterized the present moment as the “Age of Anything-Can-Happen.” Today I say, beware, America. Don’t believe that it can’t happen here.

Helaine Olen: Donald Trump is the real anarchist

President Trump wants us to believe anarchists are responsible for our nation’s sorry state.

“Our nation has been gripped by professional anarchists,” he declared from the Rose Garden on Monday night. Those anarchists have, he said, joined with “violent mobs, arsonists, looters, criminals, rioters, antifa and others” to bring mayhem to the United States.

But let’s be clear. The leading cause of the chaos sweeping the streets of the United States is Trump. What has happened to our nation over both the past nearly 3½ years and the past week is exactly what we should expect to happen when the person in charge has no stated beliefs other than his self-interest, and little agenda other than tearing down the accomplishments of others. [..]

In the guise of promoting what he calls “law and order,” Trump instead promotes violence, chaos and anarchy. And, in the best-case scenario, we’ve got at least six more months of this. It’s fantastical to think Trump will suddenly act with reason and restraint as he fights for his reelection. But the thought of four more years of this is almost too painful to bear.

Richard Wolffe: Trump has reached the ‘mad emperor’ stage, and it’s terrifying to behold

He incites violence from the safety of a bunker, then orders peaceful people tear-gassed for the sake of a surreal photo op

Writing from a Birmingham jail, Martin Luther King Jr famously told his anxious fellow clergymen that his non-violent protests would force those in power to negotiate for racial justice. “The time is always ripe to do right,” he wrote.

On an early summer evening, two generations later, Donald Trump walked out of the White House, where he’d been hiding in a bunker. Military police had just fired teargas and flash grenades at peaceful protesters to clear his path, so that he could wave a Bible in front of a boarded church.

For Trump, the time is always ripe to throw kerosene on his own dumpster fire. [..]

This is no coincidence of timing. In other crises, in other eras, there have been presidents who understood their most basic duty: to calm the violence and protect the people. In this crisis, however, we have a president who built his entire political career as a gold-painted tower to incite violence.

We were told, by Trump’s supporters four years ago, that we should have taken him seriously but not literally. As it happened, it was entirely appropriate to take him literally, as a serious threat to the rule of law.

Cornel West: A boot is crushing the neck of American democracy

The fundamental question at this moment is: can the United States be reformed?

Here we go again. Another black person killed by the US police. Another wave of multiracial resistance. Another cycle of race talk on the corporate media. Another display of diversity with neoliberal leaders, and another white backlash soon to come. Yet this time might be a turning point.

The undeniable barbaric death of George Floyd, the inescapable vicious realities of the unequal misery of the coronavirus, the massive unemployment at Depression levels and the wholesale collapse of the legitimacy of political leadership (in both parties) are bringing down the curtain on the American empire. [..]

The fundamental question at this moment is: can this failed social experiment be reformed? The political duopoly of an escalating neofascist Donald Trump-led Republican party and a fatigued Joe Biden-led neoliberal Democratic party – in no way equivalent, yet both beholden to Wall Street and the Pentagon – are symptoms of a decadent leadership class. The weakness of the labor movement and the present difficulty of the radical left to unite around a nonviolent revolutionary project of democratic sharing and redistribution of power, wealth and respect are signs of a society unable to regenerate the best of its past and present. Any society that refuses to eliminate or attenuate dilapidated housing, decrepit school systems, mass incarceration, massive unemployment and underemployment, inadequate healthcare and its violations of rights and liberties is undesirable and unsustainable.

Mitch Landrieu: The Price We Have Paid for Not Confronting Racism

We will remain trapped in a cycle of anger and hopelessness until more white Americans come to grips with our past.

I was struck by these words.

“To pursue our present course will involve the continuing polarization of the American community and, ultimately, the destruction of basic democratic values.”

I read on. The alternative “will require a commitment to national action — compassionate, massive and sustained, backed by the resources of the most powerful and the richest nation on this earth. From every American it will require new attitudes, new understanding, and, above all, new will.”

No, this was not a news report in the wake of unrest in cities across America this week. It was not a statement about the devastating impact of the coronavirus.

Some 52 years ago, the bipartisan National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders — better known as the Kerner Commission, appointed by President Lyndon Johnson — released a report after researching and analyzing the causes that had led to over 150 race-related riots in 1967. [..]

Unfortunately for all of us, the report’s recommendations were mostly shelved, deemed too expensive and controversial. Johnson, who commissioned the report and is rightly hailed as a hero for championing civil rights and the poor, barely acknowledged it largely out of fear of how it would be received by the white middle class.

The truth is, we do not have a deficit of ideas in this country. We have a deficit of courage.

And what a price we have paid.

This Is Not America

Cartnoon

Well, you could pick the next Cave over and join me.

Course I’d have to Brand my Goats even though I know them by smell. Expect they’ll resent it a mite.

What do you know, the Land of Cleves.

$37K per year.

The Breakfast Club (The Day Democracy Died)

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We’re a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we’re not too hungover we’ve been bailed out we’re not too exhausted from last night’s (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:00am (ET) (or whenever we get around to it) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late, it’s PhilJD’s fault.

This Day in History

Ed White is the first American to walk in space; Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini and Pope John XXIII die; Britain’s Duke of Windsor weds Wallis Simpson; Poet Allen Ginsberg and entertainer Josephine Baker born.

Breakfast Tunes

Something to Think about over Coffee Prozac

It has never been, and never will be easy work! But the road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination.

Marion Zimmer Bradley

Continue reading

Stephen King Defeated

I am happy to announce that at 00:01 on Wednesday, June 3rd 2020 noted Racist Stephen King was defeated by Randy Feenstra in Iowa’s 4th Congressional District Republican Primary according to The New York Times.

Dailyish Last Nightly (New & Improved)

Now with double the columns, in half the space! Thanks for the tips EK.

Instead, We Have Donald Trump Trump has RoboCop thinking about a career change
James Smartwood’s White Guy Womb Killer Mike: Learn From Jane Elliot
Experience The Upheaval Of The 1960’s All Over Again Trump’s Response to Floyd Protest: A Closer Look
Late Night Storytime: Trump Family Quarantine Amber Ruffin Shares Her Experience with Police
Michael Che Talks About the BLM Protests Dominos of Racial Injustice, Daily Show
Trump’s Weird Way of Standing, Daily Show Voting by Mail: Last Week Tonight

Apostolic Succession

Who was the first Bishop of Rome?

It’s generally accepted that it was the Apostle Peter, you are the Rock on which I will build my Church Thrice Denying Peter.

You know, on what basis are you claiming to be a Christian if you don’t know the Grips and Words?

Anyway in the Western (Roman) Catholic Church they’re very particular about who can be a Bishop and it’s highly controlled by the Pope and his Allies. In the East you need a number of Bishops (three I think) to agree with you but ascension to a Bishopric is not centrally controlled and as a result there are a lot of Branches of Eastern Orthodoxy but only one Roman Catholic Church.

Bishops and Priests take a lot of pride in the fact that they are the spiritual descendants of Peter, and through him, Christ, and it’s a privilege they rigorously defended for over 1000 years. That kind of changed in 1534 when Henry VIII proclaimed in the Act of Supremacy that he was “”Supreme Head on earth of the Church of England”.

You know, Episcopalians.

Yeah, he just wanted to boink Anne Boleyn instead of Catherine of Aragon and was thwarted by Clement VII, but the motivations are not really what is important.

Henry had a bunch of English Bishops (all appointed under Apostolic Succession) and they were quite willing to appoint more English Bishops which, technically, they could do.

The Episcopalians are the only other Church outside of Roman Catholicism to claim direct Spiritual Succession from Jesus Christ himself through Peter.

So whose Bible is it Kellyanne?

‘That is not her Bible’: Kellyanne Conway attacks bishop who criticized Trump photo op
By David Edwards, Raw Story
June 2, 2020

White House adviser Kellyanne Conway on Tuesday lashed out at Bishop Mariann Edgar Budde of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington over criticism of President Donald Trump’s photo op at St. John’s Episcopal Church.

Buddle had issued a statement condemning the president’s actions after active duty military cleared the streets of protesters so that he could have his picture taken in front of the church.

“He took the symbols sacred to our tradition and stood in front of a house of prayer in full expectation that would be a celebratory moment,” she said.

During an appearance on Fox News, host Harris Faulkner noted that Budde had been outraged at the way the church and the Bible were used as props by Trump.

Conway, however, attempted to divert the conversation to actions Trump has taken on behalf of the faith community. She noted that Trump had “prayed for the soul” of George Floyd, who died at the hands of police.

“That is the best answer to the question you asked about the Episcopal minister,” she continued. “That is not — quote — her church. That is not — quote — her Bible. We don’t look into other people’s hearts and souls and discern and judge what their faith is, why the president felt compelled to walk there, why he held that Bible up.”

“That is a symbol to everyone that we will not allow arsonists and anarchists who set that fire ablaze, who really demean the memory of those who have lost their lives in the name of their respective faiths and religions,” Conway said. “We won’t allow them to dissuade us from practicing our religion.”

Umm… what Religion is that Kellyanne? Mammon Worship?

I’ll point out the commonly used King James version is entirely the product of the Episcopal Church.

And that Church? The Deed says “Episcopal Church of the United States” and has for over 100 years.

Who owns that Church?

Rot From The Top

Perhaps you have heard about the dismissal of Louisville Kentucky’s Police Chief Steve Conrad after the murder of David McAtee, a kindly Restauranteur who frequently comped Cops free meals.

Well, it’s about as bad as you might think.

Louisville Police Left the Body of David McAtee on the Street for 12 Hours
by Aída Chávez, The Intercept
June 1 2020

The body of David McAtee laid in the streets of Louisville, Kentucky, for over 12 hours on Monday. McAtee had been killed by law enforcement just after midnight on Sunday, May 31, amid days of protests over police violence nationwide. Noon the next day, protesters were gathered at the site. McAtee’s body was still there.

McAtee, the owner of a local barbecue business and a beloved community figure, was shot and killed after Louisville police and the National Guard opened fire on a crowd that had gathered at a parking lot on 26th and Broadway. As the owner of YaYa’s BBQ, McAtee was known to give police officers free meals. Bystanders and witnesses have said that the crowd was not protesting when the police arrived. Police claim that they were returning fire after the crowd began shooting.

By the way, there is absolutely no evidence confirming this and several witnesses dispute it.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear attributed the killing to the Louisville Metro Police Department and the National Guard. Police officers, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said, had not activated their body cameras in violation of policy. Police Chief Steve Conrad was fired as a result, but retains his pension. Acting Chief Robert Schroeder, at the press conference, seemed to walk back Beshear’s statement pending investigation. “We do not know who shot him,” he said, “we do not know if it was related to a separate incident, if it was due to the shots fired by our officers and the National Guardsmen soldiers who accompanied them.” The press conference did not address why McAtee’s body was left outside, and Louisville police did not respond to a request for comment.

Robert LeVertis Bell, a community activist who’s running for the Louisville Metro Council in the 4th District, was among the hundreds of protesters who had gathered at the scene early Monday afternoon. He said the crowd was made up mostly of members of the community, not experienced activists, who were angry and hurt. “We were already dealing with the death of Breonna Taylor,” he said, referring to the police shooting of a young black woman two months ago.

Why not call it what it is? It’s murder.

“Even if they had some sort of legitimate, procedural reason for [keeping the body at the scene] you’d think they would have in mind the trauma that they’re inflicting when they do that, especially having experienced that with the Mike Brown case in Ferguson,” Bell said. “That’s the first thing I thought, that this was terrorism… because it’s terrorizing, even if they don’t intentionally try to do it.”

Protests of police brutality around the country saw escalating violence over the weekend, with police driving vehicles into crowds and firing rubber bullets, tear gas, and flash grenades, in clashes that have gone viral on social media. Police have arrested more than 4,100 people over days of demonstrations, according to a tally from the Associated Press, and several protesters have been killed. On Saturday night in Omaha, Nebraska, Jake Gardner, a white bar owner, shot and killed James Scurlock, a 22-year-old black man, outside his establishment. On Monday, prosecutors said the man acted in self defense and would not be charged. Calvin L. Horton Jr. was shot and killed outside a pawnshop in Minneapolis. Chris Beaty, a former football player, and Dorian Murrell were also shot and killed in separate incidents in Indianapolis over the weekend, though it was not immediately clear who was responsible for either killing. A protester died in St. Louis after reportedly being dragged on the highway by a FedEx truck.

At the mayor’s press conference, Kentucky State Rep. Charles Booker, a Louisville native who is challenging Mitch McConnell for Senate in 2020, spoke for the community. “My voice is strained because I’ve been doing a lot of yelling and crying as well,” he said, and called for police officers involved in Taylor’s death to be relieved of their duties and for the investigations in Taylor’s death to be expedited. “To lose your job when someone has died at your hands is a small price to pay.”

Of course he was Black. What more probable cause do you need? Most likely a Fugitive Slave.

Pondering the Pundits

Pondering the Pundits” is an Open Thread. It is a selection of editorials and opinions from around the news media and the internet blogs. The intent is to provide a forum for your reactions and opinions, not just to the opinions presented, but to what ever you find important.

Thanks to ek hornbeck, click on the link and you can access all the past “Pondering the Pundits”.

Follow us on Twitter @StarsHollowGzt

Paul Krugman: Trump Takes Us to the Brink

Will weaponized racism destroy America?

Last fall Bob Kroll, the head of the Minneapolis police union, appeared at a Trump rally, where he thanked the president for ending Barack Obama’s “oppression of police” and letting cops “put the handcuffs on criminals instead of us.”

The events of the past week, in which the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody led to demonstrations against police brutality, and these demonstrations were met by more police brutality — including unprecedented violence against the news media — have made it clear what Kroll meant by taking the handcuffs off. And Donald Trump, far from trying to calm the nation, is pouring gasoline on the fire; he seems very close to trying to incite a civil war.

I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that America as we know it is on the brink.

How did we get here? The core story of U.S. politics over the past four decades is that wealthy elites weaponized white racism to gain political power, which they used to pursue policies that enriched the already wealthy at workers’ expense.

Until Trump’s rise it was possible — barely — for people to deny this reality with a straight face. At this point, however, it requires willful blindness not to see what’s going on.

Eugene Robinson: We are the governed. We no longer consent to let the police kill us.

This coast-to-coast uprising is not about terrorism, foreign or domestic. It’s not about arson, looting or carpeting streets with broken glass. It’s about a powerful phrase in the Declaration of Independence: “the consent of the governed.” Police in this country no longer have our consent to kill African Americans unjustly and with impunity.

Is that clear now?

What’s striking about the protests over the killing of George Floyd is not just the intensity of the anger the protesters express but how widely that anger has spread. Citizens have held demonstrations, marches and vigils in more than 60 cities across the country and in nearly every state. And in the week since a Minneapolis police officer ended Floyd’s life by kneeling on his neck, as Floyd pleaded “I can’t breathe,” passions have not diminished. If anything, crowds have become more ardent.

To me, this feels less and less like just another iteration of the set-piece drama we’ve lived through so many times — an unjust killing, a few days of protest, a chorus of promises of reform, a return to normal, an all-too-brief interlude until the next unjust killing. This eruption feels like a potential inflection point, a collective decision that “normal” is no longer acceptable.

That message is being delivered in every major American city. Whether it is being heard and understood remains to be seen.

Amanda Marcotte: Trump has reshaped law enforcement: Endless cover-up for him, brutal clampdown on dissent

Trump puts himself above the law, but encourages police to assault anyone who objects to his criminal regime

Despite headlines and news reports replete with loaded terms like “looting” and “riots,” the real story of this past weekend was not the behavior of people on the streets protesting police violence. It was a story of numerous local police departments, emboldened by a wannabe fascist president, turning brownshirt against the ordinary people they are supposedly there to serve and protect. Make no mistake about it: This is a police uprising against American citizens. That’s the true narrative.

As my colleagues at Salon spent the weekend documenting, the police assaulted, arrested, shot and gassed journalists, and even ran over peaceful protesters in an outburst of rage at the public for objecting to unchecked police power. In doing so, they were, egged on by Donald Trump. Police in Minneapolis set the tone by using tear gas against peaceful protesters on Tuesday, and ever since cops across the country have been doing everything they could to shift the headlines away from “protest” to “riots” by attacking protesters until they fight back or turn to property destruction.

Meanwhile, Trump isn’t even bothering to hide that this is is more exciting to him than a fourth trophy wife and a barrelful of Viagra. He kicked things off early by encouraging police violence with a tweet promising “when the looting starts, the shooting starts,” a direct quote from a notorious Miami police chief of the 1960s. He spent the weekend spooning out more turgid and sadistic tweets cheering on police brutality and calling for “Law & Order” against “Radical Left Anarchists,” even though it was the cops who were roaming through neighborhoods shooting rubber bullets at people who were often doing nothing but sitting on their porches.

Part of this is the unsavory fact that Trump gets off on violent, racist fantasies, even though he’s personally a coward who likes to hide behind others willing to do the hard work of actually assaulting people. Another part of it is that Trump thinks or hopes this is his political Hail Mary, that could distract the voters from 40 million unemployed and more than 106,000 dead from COVID-19.

 
Michelle Goldberg: The de Blasio Disappointment

He began with such progressive promise. Now it’s in tatters.

On Saturday, during the demonstrations sparked by George Floyd’s killing, two New York Police Department SUVs drove into a crowd of protesters in Brooklyn who were pelting them with projectiles. The cars knocked several people over. In aerial footage, the road behind the vehicles was mostly clear — it looked as if they could have backed up instead.

It was one of several scenes of New York Police Department violence caught on video over the last several days. On Friday, State Senator Zellnor Myrie of Brooklyn, who told my colleagues he went to a protest to try to serve as a mediator with the police, was pepper-sprayed and arrested. Video showed a police officer violently shoving a young woman to the ground; she ended up in the hospital. The next day, a cop approached a young black man who was standing with hands in the air, yanked down his mask and pepper-sprayed him. [..]

But late Saturday night, addressing the unrest in New York, de Blasio seemed to see the confrontations almost entirely through the eyes of law enforcement. “I’m not going to blame officers who were trying to deal with an absolutely impossible situation,” he said of the cops in the two SUVs. The next day he called for an investigation into the incident, but praised the N.Y.P.D. for showing “tremendous restraint.” It took him until Monday to forcefully condemn it. [..]

What happened? In part, it could just be a shift in perspective. The mayor has an obvious interest in keeping order, and some of the protests have devolved into looting and vandalism. But in several cases it’s the police who have instigated violence. If de Blasio has been reluctant to call them out, perhaps it’s because he’s been subdued by years of unremitting police hostility.

The mayor’s relationship with the N.Y.P.D. has been poisonous almost from the beginning, and now he’s caught between the demands of his base and a police force whose cooperation he needs. His mayoral legacy, already badly damaged by his handling of the pandemic, is collapsing.

Jennifer Rubin: We saw it with our own eyes: Trump wants to go to war against America

President Trump somehow imagined it was a good idea to unleash law enforcement on peaceful demonstrators before the 7 p.m. curfew Monday night as he stepped into the Rose Garden to give a knockoff version of Richard M. Nixon’s “law and order” message.

The president who called NFL protesters peacefully taking a knee “sons of bitches,” lied when he declared that he is a friend of peaceful demonstrators. The police firing rubber bullets and launching tear gas at protesters in Lafayette Square in front of the White House said otherwise. Then, as if the scene was not evidence enough of his desire to raise the level of violence, he pledged to deploy the U.S. military on U.S. soil, against U.S. civilians, if governors did not heed his incendiary advice to fill the streets with National Guard troops. It was later revealed that Trump instigated the assault on protesters specifically to make a gesture of walking to St. John’s church.

Nothing could be more representative of the dangerous narcissism of a president in over his head, resorting to threats of violence against a country he ostensibly is supposed to lead. The deliberate instigation of violence for his own photo op tells Americans how deeply twisted and deformed his character is.

Load more