Rant of the Week: Seth Myers – Trump’s Horror Movie

Late Night host Seth Meyers takes a closer look at the House preparing for a formal vote to authorize the impeachment inquiry into President Trump and Republicans comparing their situation to “a horror movie.”

‘What Is Best In Life?’

Crush your enemies. Crush your enemies. And see them driven before you…

Never work an act after kids or dogs. Unless you have Gracie dancing backward in high heels.

See?

I write fluently in 7 languages.

Six of them are Computer.

Look left. Look right. Look up.

Only one of you will be graduating from the prestigious Liberty University School of Law. Better pray hard.

Wednesday

What? Yours are not like this?

Chinese or Italian?

You know, Stars Hollow is itself so remote we don’t have delivery anything except for Al’s Pancake World, or even a drive through Dunkin’ Donuts (Luke has been talking about putting in a window for years but I am reluctant to drive the Jeep through Doose’s General Store. Besides, I think he’s kidding, it’s hard to tell sometimes.).

Speaking of Stars Hollow

I try not to. Yes, exactly like this.

Too Millenial?

Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth a youth to Fortune and to Fame unknown.

Fair Science frown’d not on his humble birth, and Melancholy mark’d him for her own.

Large was his bounty, and his soul sincere. Heav’n did a recompense as largely send.

He gave to Mis’ry all he had, a tear. He gain’d from Heav’n (’twas all he wish’d) a friend.

No farther seek his merits to disclose or draw his frailties from their dread abode.

Yeah, we do Front Page Poetry at The Stars Hollow Gazette and don’t you forget it! Thomas Gray, 1751.

More Thoughts About Death

Bredon. Rhymes with breath, not teeth.

The Face of War

Oh, news. Don’t you know it’s the weekend? Update?

And I’m sure your question is, doesn’t Smokery Farms deliver to Stars Hollow and the answer is- of course they do, we’re cutting edge and can barely dodge the drones, however the point of delivery is the Post Office Box and Mistress already has me on her list.

I could talk about it for hours but I told you we’d run out of time Chris.

House

“New York?”

“Queens.”

“Ah.”

No Sleep Till Brooklyn – Beastie Boys

1979 – The Smashing Pumpkins

1985 – Bowling For Soup

The Breakfast Club (Cold)

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We’re a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we’re not too hungover we’ve been bailed out we’re not too exhausted from last night’s (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:30am (ET) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late, it’s PhilJD’s fault.

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AP’s Today in History for November 3rd

Iran-Contra scandal begins to unfold; Chile’s Salvador Allende takes office; Carol Moseley-Braun is first black woman elected to U.S. Senate; Former pro-wrestler Jesse Ventura elected Minnesota governor.

Breakfast Tune Himno Nacional de Chile en banjo

Something to think about, Breakfast News & Blogs below

 

A GROUP OF PROGRESSIVE WOMEN JUST LAUNCHED A WORKING-CLASS VERSION OF EMILY’S LIST
Aída Chávez, The Intercept

THIS WEEK, a coalition of more than three dozen progressive women joined forces to launch an organization dedicated to electing women from working-class and low-income backgrounds to Congress. Matriarch, a political action committee, intends to boost grassroots candidates by providing early financial and institutional support to women who aren’t independently wealthy or able to raise large amounts of money in short periods of time. The initiative, which is a couple of years in the making, is the latest effort in the progressive movement’s work to build an ecosystem in which lesser-known candidates are given the tools to succeed.

Justice Democrats, the group that recruited and helped elect New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, for example, was created to boost insurgents who wanted to challenge corporate Democrats in Congress. And its sister organization launched Movement School earlier this year to train working-class organizers how to work as campaign managers, communications directors, and field directors.

From former elected officials and congressional candidates to labor leaders and political activists, the women behind Matriarch are drawing from their own experiences navigating the political system to help create an infrastructure that supports working women, who often also deal with household and child care responsibilities at the same time as campaigning.

 

 

Something to think about over coffee prozac

 
What if Lizzo’s Truth Hurts was by Mumford & Sons? (ft. Nataly Dawn of Pomplamoose)
 

Pondering the Pundits: Sunday Preview Edition

Pondering the Pundits: Sunday Preview Edition” is an Open Thread. It is a selection of editorials and opinions from around the news medium and the internet blogs. The intent is to provide a forum for your reactions and opinions, not just to the opinions presented, but to what ever you find important.

On Sunday mornings we present a preview of the guests on the morning talk shows so you can choose which ones to watch or some do something more worth your time on a Sunday morning.

Follow us on Twitter @StarsHollowGzt

The Sunday Talking Heads:

This Week with George Stephanopolis: The guests on Sunday’s “This Week” are: Democratic Presidential Candidate Mayor Pete Buttigieg; House Foreign Affairs Committee Chair Rep. Eliot Engel (D-NY); and Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA).

The roundtable guests are: Former Gov. Chris Christie (R-NJ); former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel; Axios National Political Reporter Alexi McCammond; and Associated Press Washington Bureau Chief Julie Pace.

Face the Nation: Host Margaret Brennan’s guests are: House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA); House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer; House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD); and Rep. Jackie Speier (D-CA).

Her panel guests are: David Drucker, Washington Examiner; David Nakamura, Washington Post; CBS News Chief Congressional Correspondent Nancy Cordes; and John Hudson, Washington Post.

Meet the Press with Chuck Todd: The guests on this week’s “MTP” are: Rep. Terri Sewell (D-AL); Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK); and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

The panel guests are: NBC journalist Tom Brokaw; Helene Cooper, New York Times correspondent; John Harwood, CNBC editor-at large; Rich Lowry, editor National Review; and Anna Palmer, Politico Washington correspondent.

State of the Union with Jake Tapper: Mr. Tapper’s guests are: White House liar Kellyanne Conway; House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-SC); and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang.

His panel guests are: Rep. Robin Kelly (D-IL); former Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D-VA); conservative commentator Scott Jennings; and Mary Catherine Ham, The Federalist.

The Big Dark

The end of Daylight Savings means little to me as I run on a mixture of Atlantic TZ, crystal meth, and passed out exhaustion in the best of times and these are not those. These are the times my Therapist wants 2 a weeks with daily light box and my family has been instructed to conceal pointy objects and make sure I’m wearing my safety helmet.

It saves the desktop from denting.

I was spared a session on Halloween which is fine because I don’t think they’re quite ready for my full bore Johnny Depp Stockton costume, especially the part where I Evel Knievel the parking lot retaining wall in reverse to check for “stress factors”.

Actually I think my Therapist would be ok because we have this kind of Arkham/Harley vibe going but I’m not sure everyone else is ready for a trip Back to the Future.

I have never been a quitter. To leave office before my term is completed is abhorrent to every instinct in my body. But as President, I must put the interest of America first. America needs a full-time President and a full-time Congress, particularly at this time with problems we face at home and abroad.

To continue to fight through the months ahead for my personal vindication would almost totally absorb the time and attention of both the President and the Congress in a period when our entire focus should be on the great issues of peace abroad and prosperity without inflation at home.

Therefore, I shall resign the Presidency effective at noon tomorrow. Vice President Ford will be sworn in as President at that hour in this office.

If a spooky historical parallel continues, Biden is due for a breakdown
The Washington Post
November 1, 2019

Back then we had an unpopular president reviled by Democrats, Richard Nixon. Back then a large Democratic field was led by a bland establishment figure whose fame was that he had been nominated for vice president, Edmund Muskie. Back then, the Democratic left pushed an intellectual senator backing a program that for its time was exceedingly progressive, South Dakota’s George McGovern. Sound familiar?

The similarities continue. Back then, Nixon’s dirty tricks squad, the Plumbers, tried to dislodge Muskie from his perch. Assisted by a young Roger Stone, they finally got Muskie to famously cry in the New Hampshire snow, responding to a smear the tricksters had planted about his wife. Today, perhaps led by an aged Roger Stone, Trump’s team is taking on the famously emotional Joe Biden’s son Hunter. Can another crying-in-the-snow moment be far behind?

Even the campaign’s weird elements seem to be resurfacing. Gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson falsely contended that Muskie was a user of a hallucinogenic illegal drug, ibogaine. Today, Hunter Biden has openly admitted to using ibogaine at a Tijuana treatment center. You just can’t make this stuff up.

We all know how 1972 ended up. Muskie, who had led Nixon in the polls in the summer of 1971, quickly tumbled into oblivion as McGovern surged. Biden, like Muskie, is grimly holding on but looks like he could finish as poorly as fourth in Iowa or New Hampshire as Warren seizes the McGovern mantle and wins both states. Late efforts by the establishment to stop McGovern came to naught; any attempt to push a late entrant like Michael Bloomberg or try to arrange a brokered convention so the superdelegates can choose the winner would probably splinter the party today. Ultimately, Nixon cruised to an easy reelection, painting himself as the safe alternative to the scary liberal. Democrats gnashed their teeth as Tricky Dick took the oath of office again.

Of course, back then, Democrats had the last laugh as their impeachment inquiry drove Nixon from office. Today, Democrats are unleashing the impeachment bomb early to quell the time warp’s eerie magic. Don’t be surprised, though, if this seeming treat turns into a trick as we travel back to our future.

In Other News- Bambi Meets Godzilla

History shows again and again how nature points out the folly of man.

7th Century (BCE) Tech faces off against Tim “Tool Time” Taylor, Al, and the good folks at Binford who can solve all your border crossing needs with their complete line of ladders, reciprocating saws, and earthmoving equipment rentals (Parker “How deep do you want the hole?” Schnabel optional at slight additional expense).

Trump said the new border wall was “impenetrable.” Smugglers are sawing through it.
By Catherine Kim, Vox
Nov 2, 2019

President Donald Trump promised a wall on the border would radically change undocumented immigration and customs enforcement. But it turns out newly built sections of the president’s wall aren’t as sturdy as he promised: Smugglers have been using a commercial saw to cut through it, according to the Washington Post.

Smuggling people and goods into the US is a profitable industry for criminal organizations, which is why they are motivated to innovate when it comes to breaching barriers. Of late, smugglers have reportedly been cutting through the wall — which is made of steel bollards that are partially filled with concrete — to make gaps large enough for people and goods to pass through.

To do so, smugglers are reportedly using a reciprocating saw that can be bought for as little as $100. The tool can cut through the wall’s steel and concrete in minutes when fitted with the appropriate blades, Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents have said.

After cutting the steel bollards, smugglers have taken to returning them to their original positions in hope of reusing the passage without being detected by border officials.

Agents now reportedly patrol the wall in search of defects, which are mended. However, those repaired sections of wall are prime targets for smugglers, as it is easier to cut through the welded metal than it is to make new cuts. And the repair policy has also been targeted by smugglers who attempt to fool agents into believing a severed bollard has been fixed by applying putty to the site of the cut.

All of this should be unsurprising to the Trump administration. NBC News has reported border barrier prototypes tested in 2017 were found to be vulnerable to reciprocating saws. At the time, CBP spokesman Ralph DeSio argued that no wall, however well designed, would be impenetrable.

That didn’t stop Trump from touting the wall as “virtually impenetrable” when he visited a construction site close to San Diego in September, according to NBC News. At the time, he said the wall — which has cost roughly $10 billion so far and has been mostly funded by taxpayers — would successfully block human traffickers from entering the US. He added that not even world class climbers would be able to scale the structure, especially because the materials that comprise it would become too hot to hold in the desert sun.

Yet smugglers have also found ways of climbing the wall. A method that involves using rebar ladders to scale one side and rope ladders to descend the other has become especially popular near San Diego, despite the risk of falling from the height of a three-story-building (the barrier can be up to 30 feet tall).

It is unclear how many breaches there have been so far because the US government has yet to disclose any incidents. Some officials who spoke to The Washington Post anonymously played down the situation, saying there had been only “a few instances” and the wall has “significantly increased security and deterrence.”

The reality, however, is that there is no single physical barrier can completely stop smugglers — even CBP officials acknowledge that. The solution, officials say, is to augment the wall with surveillance technology and border agents on the ground who can combat smugglers. Without such a system, smugglers won’t be deterred, they said.

For Trump, however, this reality may not matter much: The wall’s effectiveness is perhaps less important than its existence, which allows him to truthfully say he has made good on a signature campaign promise.

More Cowbell.

House

Sugar, We’re Goin’ Down – Fall Out Boy

My Own Worst Enemy – Lit

Lifestyles of the Rich & Famous – Good Charlotte

Life’s Been Good – Joe Walsh

“You look remarkably well preserved. How old are you?”

“Twenty seven. It’s not the years, it’s the mileage.”

End Of The Line – The Traveling Wilburys

The Breakfast Club (Extinction)

Welcome to The Breakfast Club! We’re a disorganized group of rebel lefties who hang out and chat if and when we’re not too hungover we’ve been bailed out we’re not too exhausted from last night’s (CENSORED) the caffeine kicks in. Join us every weekday morning at 9am (ET) and weekend morning at 10:00am (ET) (or whenever we get around to it) to talk about current news and our boring lives and to make fun of LaEscapee! If we are ever running late, it’s PhilJD’s fault.

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This Day in History

President Harry Truman wins re-election in an upset; South Vietnam’s Ngo Dinh Diem killed after coup; Howard Hughes flies his ‘Spruce Goose’; Game show scandal rocks early TV; Singer k.d. lang born.

Breakfast Tunes

Something to Think about over Coffee Prozac

If man doesn’t learn to treat the oceans and the rain forest with respect, man will become extinct.

Peter Benchley

Continue reading

Beto Bounced

Now, go and beat Cornyn and help take over the Senate yah big galoot.

Beto O’Rourke Is Dropping Out of the Presidential Race
By Alexander Burns, The New York Times
Nov. 1, 2019

Former Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas is dropping out of the presidential race, ending a campaign in which he struggled for months to recapture the energy of his insurgent 2018 Senate candidacy on a national stage full of other big personalities and liberal champions.

Mr. O’Rourke made the decision to quit the race in the middle of this week, on the eve of a gathering Friday of Democratic presidential candidates in Iowa, according to people familiar with his thinking. He is not expected to run for any other office in 2020, despite persistent efforts by party leaders and political donors to coax him into another bid for the Senate.

His campaign has been under extreme financial strain, and Mr. O’Rourke’s advisers concluded that proceeding in the race might have meant making deep cuts to his staff in order to pay for advertising and other measures to compete in the early primary and caucus state.

Mr. O’Rourke planned to announce his withdrawal from the race in Iowa on Friday evening and follow up with an email message to his supporters. In that message, a draft of which was reviewed by The New York Times, Mr. O’Rourke said he was proud of championing issues like guns and climate change but conceded that his campaign lacked “the means to move forward successfully.”

“My service to the country will not be as a candidate or as the nominee,” he said.

By leaving the race, Mr. O’Rourke completes the winding path from his early status as a potential front-runner to his drastic decision over the summer to reframe his candidacy as an activist crusader following the mass shooting targeting Latinos in his home city of El Paso.

Since then, Mr. O’Rourke has campaigned doggedly on issues related to guns and race, calling most notably for federal gun-control policies that would require owners of assault-style weapons to surrender them to the government. That’s a far more aggressive stance than most Democratic presidential candidates have endorsed.

That last phase of his campaign has taken Mr. O’Rourke far beyond the early-state circuit, and included visits with prison inmates in California and an immigrant community in Mississippi. In an August interview following the El Paso massacre, Mr. O’Rourke said his focus would be “taking the fight to Donald Trump” and “being with those who have been denigrated and demeaned.”

In recent weeks, he has also criticized other Democrats in newly strident terms, declaring in September that Senator Chuck Schumer, the New York Democrat and Senate minority leader, had accomplished “absolutely nothing” on gun control.

Mr. O’Rourke entered the 2020 primary in the middle of March with the aura of a celebrity, cheered by rank-and-file Democrats and admired by no less a figure than former President Barack Obama for his near miss challenge to Senator Ted Cruz in the nation’s largest red state. He effectively unveiled his run for the White House in a cover story for Vanity Fair in which he declared he was “just born to be in it.” He later described the cover, along with his choice of words, as a mistake.

In the earliest days of his campaign, Mr. O’Rourke was a fund-raising powerhouse, collecting more than $6 million in his first day as a candidate. But his fund-raising cratered almost immediately. He raised more in his first 48 hours than in the following thousand days, and steadily depleted his campaign treasury by spending more than he was taking in.

And despite the near-heroic status he achieved in the eyes of Democratic voters as a daring challenger to a Republican they loathed — Mr. Cruz — Mr. O’Rourke found it far more difficult to stand out from a crop of presidential candidates that included other young orators, like Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., and determined progressives like Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

Mr. O’Rourke also came under harsh attack in a June debate from Julián Castro, the former housing secretary and a fellow Texan, who blasted Mr. O’Rourke from the left on immigration. Mr. O’Rourke, who was not an especially strong debater in his Senate campaign, appeared badly caught off guard.

To Mr. O’Rourke and his allies, it has been evident for some time that he was confronting a vanishingly slim path forward. At the last Democratic debate, a pair of Mr. O’Rourke’s donors flew to Ohio to meet with him about his campaign and the possibility of him quitting the race to run for Senate in Texas against John Cornyn, who is up for re-election. Mr. O’Rourke told them he was not running for Senate, according to people familiar with the matter.

A spokesman to Mr. O’Rourke reiterated that stance on Friday.

“Beto will not be a candidate for U.S. Senate in Texas in 2020,” said Rob Friedlander, an aide to Mr. O’Rourke.

It is unclear whether Mr. O’Rourke’s exit will have a significant impact on the larger shape of the Democratic primary race. In a New York Times/Siena College poll released on Friday, Mr. O’Rourke was supported by just 1 percent of likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa. He had not yet met the thresholds for participating in the upcoming primary debates in November and December.

Mr. O’Rourke may find — as other former candidates have done — that the good will of his fellow Democrats returns quickly once he is no longer a competitor for the nomination. He is 47 years old, leaving him plenty of time to consider a return to electoral politics. But in a recent interview with Politico, Mr. O’Rourke said that if he did not prevail in the 2020 presidential primary he would not become a candidate again.

“I cannot fathom a scenario where I would run for public office again if I’m not the nominee,” Mr. O’Rourke said last month.

In not news Kamala Harris is betting it all on Iowa, virtually shutting down her New Hampshire operation. Her problem is that though California moved up it’s Primary to have greater influence it’s a proportional State and not ‘Winner Takes All’. In any event she’s only polling 4th even as a ‘Favorite Daughter’.

Things are thinning out quite fast enough you Establisment Centrists, too bad your candidates are not doing better (Hah!)

Pondering the Pundits

Pondering the Pundits” is an Open Thread. It is a selection of editorials and opinions from> around the news medium and the internet blogs. The intent is to provide a forum for your reactions and opinions, not just to the opinions presented, but to what ever you find important.

Thanks to ek hornbeck, click on the link and you can access all the past “Pondering the Pundits”.

Follow us on Twitter @StarsHollowGzt

Paul Krugman: Did Warren Pass the Medicare Test? I Think So

Her plan is serious, even if it probably won’t happen.

Last week I worried that Elizabeth Warren had painted herself into a corner by endorsing the Sanders Medicare-for-all plan. It was becoming obvious that she couldn’t stay vague about the details, especially how to pay for it; and some studies, even by center-left think tanks, suggested that any plan along these lines would require large tax hikes on the middle class. So what would she come up with?

Well, the Warren plan is now out. And I’d say that she passed the test. Experts will argue for months whether she’s being too optimistic — whether her cost estimates are too low and her revenue estimates too high, whether we can really do this without middle-class tax hikes. You might say that time will tell, but it probably won’t: Even if Warren becomes president, and Dems take the Senate too, it’s very unlikely that Medicare for all will happen any time soon.

Catherine Rampell: The GOP tax cut failed. Their response? Let’s do it again!

Faced with a slowing economy and waves of factory closures and farming bankruptcies, President Trump and Republican lawmakers are finally going back to the drawing board.

So far, this brain trust has come up with . . . the exact same failed policy formula that got us these results in the first place. [..]

The GOP response to lackluster economic growth does seem to be changing, though. Apparently, Republicans now realize they need to show they’re doing something, anything, to shore up the economy going into the 2020 election.

And what have they settled on? Why, more tax cuts.

The White House is working with Republican lawmakers to develop “tax cuts 2.0,” as Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) told my Post colleagues. Even if such a policy couldn’t get through the Democratic House, Republicans think the idea will give voters reason to support the party come election time. It’s a peculiar strategy not just for economic reasons, but political ones, as well: Tax cuts 1.0 have had underwater approval ratings virtually every day since they were first proposed in 2017.

But hey, when all you have is a hammer, why not just bash yourself in the head?

Eugene Robinson: The facts are only going to get worse for Trump

Republicans said they wanted process, so now they have it. The question is whether President Trump’s defenders are willing, finally, to address the substance of the allegations against him.

Thursday’s historic vote by the House set out procedures for the inquiry into Trump’s conduct that give the president every opportunity to defend himself. Before and after the vote, GOP leaders complained that Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was running a “Soviet-style” impeachment process, which must be one of the dumbest things ever said on the House floor. The old Soviet Union didn’t do impeachments, with accusation by one legislative chamber, judgment by the other, the nation’s highest judicial officer presiding and the ultimate sanction being removal from office. It did purges, followed by a one-way trip to the gulag.

It sounded as though Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and his colleagues were grasping at the wispiest of straws, and they were. Odds are that they will continue to do so as long as they can. Meanwhile, however, the process they clamored for will roll on and gather momentum, with or without them.

Amanda Marcotte: Be careful what you wish for, Republicans: Now impeachment starts for real

Republicans demanded a more public impeachment process. Well, here it comes — and they’re not gonna like it

Halloween is a fitting day for a spooky morality fable, in the spirit of “The Monkey’s Paw,” about being careful about what you wish for. Republicans have cast about desperately for any talking point they can use disparage the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump, no matter how lame or transparently disingenuous. They’ve spent the past week or so feigning outrage over the closed-door testimony into Trump’s Ukrainian extortion scheme. Even though Republicans knew that there would come a time when the hearings became public, they fanned out on cable news — and even crashed a hearing room last week — making wild accusations about a lack of transparency, clawing at any pathetic straw they could use to spin a narrative about supposed Democratic malfeasance.

Well, now they’re getting what they claim they wanted: The House of Representatives voted Thursday to pass a formal resolution on the impeachment inquiry, signaling the new phase in which hearings will begin to go public. (There will probably be a few more closed-door depositions, but public hearings are expected to start right after Veteran’s Day.) As with the wishes granted by the monkey’s paw, this is what Republicans swore up and down they wanted — and what they will very likely be sorry to have received.

Dahlia Lithwick: Why I Haven’t Gone Back to SCOTUS Since Kavanaugh

Some things are worth not getting over.

It’s been just over a year since I sat in the hearing room and watched the final act of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing. I listened from the back as Christine Blasey Ford and then-Judge Kavanaugh each faced the Senate Judiciary Committee to tell irreconcilable versions of what happened in the summer of 1982. The morning was spent as I’d anticipated: all of us—the press corps, the country—listening, some clearly in agony, to Ford’s account. And then Kavanaugh came in and started screaming. The reporters at the tables around me took him in with blank shock, mindlessly typing the words he was yelling.

The enduring memory, a year later, is that my 15-year-old son texted—he was watching it in school—to ask if I was “perfectly safe” in the Senate chamber. He was afraid for the judge’s mental health and my physical health. I had to patiently explain that I was in no physical danger of any kind, that there were dozens of people in the room, and that I was at the very back, with the phalanx of reporters. My son’s visceral fears don’t really matter in one sense, beyond the fact that I was forced to explain to him that the man shouting about conspiracies and pledging revenge on his detractors would sit on the court for many decades; and in that one sense, none of us, as women, were ever going to be perfectly safe again.

Colbert Nation

As a member since Strangers With Candy I can’t say I’m surprised when Stephen reveals his policy wonk chops (nor his Star Wars and LotR geekdom though I must say he includes sources I don’t consider canon). I do think it a sad but hardly original commentary on the current state of what passes for Journalism that one can get more actual news from a late night comedy/variety show than you can from 24 hours of any of the dedicated cable channels.

Meanwhile…

Stephen gives practically a whole hour to Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (on a very busy day where the chamber adopted Rules for the Impeachment debate). When was the last time MSNBC did that?

It’s only fun and games until someone gets hurt.

Then it’s just fun.

Ok, so 22 minutes more or less, that’s 22 minutes more than you got on CNN and we got to pay bills and stuff.

And as an aside the show is so much better when you let Stephen throw heat. Let’s never go back to idiot Actors and Musicians pitching their next project.

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