Tag: Constitution of the United States

The Week in Editorial Cartoons – Republican Thuggery on Full Display, Part I

http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=quanto-costa-Viagra-generico-200-mg-online-a-Bologna Crossposted at Daily Kos and The Stars Hollow Gazette

http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=online-best-price-free-viagra

watch

Rob Rogers, see reader comments in the go to site Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Buy this cartoon

http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=viagra-generico-100-mg-miglior-prezzo-pagamento-online-a-Bologna This election season has brought out some real ghouls, some, but not all, as a result of the Tea Party.  These monsters are great for cartoonists, but not so great for the voters.  The saddest part is, none of these characters offers a message of hope.  It is all about tearing the other guy down.  I know this kind of negative campaigning happens with every election.   http://maientertainmentlaw.com/?search=do-accutane-cause-depression It just seems more frightening this year.

The Patriot Act Extension Backstory

see url http://cinziamazzamakeup.com/?x=miglior-sito-per-acquistare-viagra-generico-50-mg The Bill of Rights

Fourth Amendment – Protection from unreasonable search and seizure.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

The Patriot Act was extended for another year this week.  Read this information about it from the ACLU:


http://www.aclu.org/national-s…

Late last year, to avoid expiration on December 31, 2009, Congress extended the provisions through February 28, 2010. Despite bills pending in both the House and the Senate to amend the three expiring provisions and other sections of the Patriot Act, Congress decided instead to move ahead with a straightforward reauthorization.

Since the Patriot Act’s passage in 2001, there have been several consecutive reports (including one released in January) from the Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General that have outlined widespread and blatant abuse of the statute. FBI agents routinely claimed false terrorism emergencies to use “exigent letters,” or emergency letters, in order to gain private records for investigations when no emergency existed. The FBI also regularly issued NSLs after the fact in an attempt to legitimize the use of exigent letters. Even after today’s vote, there remain bills pending in both the House and Senate that were specifically introduced to narrow the scope of the NSL statute.